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It’s Mother’s Day here in the UK. A day when I am remembering just how blessed I’ve been to have an amazing Mum who has stood by me through good times and the bad. My Mum has never judged me and always shown me unconditional love. I guess I would describe the way I was raised as ‘firm but fair’, a parenting style I try to adopt with my own children.

Me and My Awesome Mum

Me and my awesome Mum sometime in the late 70s / early 80s

Could the way we raise our kids make them fat?

I read an article today about how researchers believe parenting style may be linked with the likelihood of childhood obesity.

The researchers found parents that are rigid with rules, fail to talk to their children or show affection have a greater chance of their offspring being obese.

Researcher Lisa Kakinami, from McGill University in Montreal, Canada, said the spiralling obesity epidemic affecting most countries meant attention should be paid to the way parents and children interact at home.

She said: “Parents should at least be aware of their parenting style. If you’re treating your child with a balance of affection and limits – these are the kids who are least likely to be obese.”

Researchers also found that poverty was associated with childhood obesity, but parenting style affected obesity regardless of income level.

The research was presented at the American Heart Association’s Epidemiology & Prevention/Nutrition, Physical Activity & Metabolism Scientific Sessions 2014.

Researchers from universities in Montreal followed a group of 37,577 Canadian children aged 0 to 11 after comparing parents’ answers to a survey on how they brought up their children and then classified parenting styles and analysed them in conjunction with their children’s body mass index (BMI). BMI is a scoring system that relates weight to height and determines obesity.

The latest figures for England show almost a third of 10-11 year olds and over a fifth of 4-5 year olds are overweight or obese. Around three-quarters of obese children are likely to remain that way as adults

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