// ViewContent // Track key page views (ex: product page, landing page or article) fbq('track', 'ViewContent'); // Search // Track searches on your website (ex. product searches) fbq('track', 'Search');

Juicing vegetables containing colourful carotenoids, such as leafy greens, sweet potato and carrots, may prevent or delay the onset of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS).

Juicing: Kiwi, Kale and Cucumber Juice Recipe

At the time of writing this my Facebook and Twitter feeds are full of videos of people completing the ALS ice bucket challenge and yesterday I got nominated too. My video is below, but before you watch it I’d like to share a little about ALS and more importantly a quick and delicious way to lower your risk.

What is Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS)?

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), sometimes called Lou Gehrig’s disease, is a form of Motor Neurone Disease (MND). It is a rapidly progressive, invariably fatal neurological disease that attacks the nerve cells responsible for controlling voluntary muscles. In other words, in impacts the muscle actions we are able to control, such as those in the arms, legs, and face.

Eventually, all muscles under voluntary control are affected, and individuals lose their strength and the ability to move their arms, legs, and body.

Most people with ALS die from respiratory failure, usually within 3 to 5 years from the onset of symptoms when muscles in the diaphragm and chest wall fail and people lose the ability to breathe without ventilatory support.

The cause of ALS is not known, and scientists do not yet know why ALS strikes some people and not others, but research published in 2013 suggests that increased consumption of carotenoids may prevent or delay the onset.

Juicing to cut the risk of ALS

The research published by Wiley in Annals of Neurology, a journal of the American Neurological Association and Child Neurology Society, suggests that increased consumption of foods containing beta-carotene and lutein, may prevent or delay ALS.

Ingredients with high levels of beta-carotene include sweet potato, carrots, dark leafy greens (such as spinach and kale) and romaine lettuce.

Some of the highest lutein containing foods are leafy green vegetables, especially kale. Lutein is also found in many fruits and vegetables including mangoes, sweet potatoes, carrots, squash and tomatoes.

Some suggested recipes include:

ALS Ice Bucket Challenge

Anyway, here is the video of me and my mate Jay Halford from Charlton Kings Coffee Shop and Deli dropping buckets of ice on our heads…

Sources

Pin It on Pinterest