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Scottish First Minister Nicola Sturgeon recently declared herself so busy that she often forgets to eat, and she is not alone; A recent survey revealed the average Briton is under so much pressure at work that they take just 14 minutes for their lunch break.

Whatever happened to the lunch hour?

We now live in a world where many people feel an increased pressure in their work, often believing breaks are for ‘wimps’ and the winners work through lunch.

I get it.

For many years I was so busy building my career, in the pursuit of wealth, that I forget about my health. I ate on the go, and as a person who was often ‘on the road’, I made the fatal mistake of fuelling my body in the same places I was fuelling my car.

“I’m too busy to eat. It wastes time”

In an article in the Daily Mail, Samantha, 35, who set up her own communications business last summer, says: “My career is part of my identity and it’s vital I do well. I run on adrenaline and caffeine. My espresso machine is within reach of my desk. My clients won’t know I’m sipping coffee as we talk, but they will realise if I’m chewing on a sandwich.”

“I’m too busy to eat. It wastes time, which is why I never do it at work,” she explains. “Food is a distraction so I don’t factor it into my working day, and my career is doing all the better for it.”

And it’s not just lunch. A survey last month revealed 55 per cent of young professionals are too busy with their career to eat breakfast.

Is this counter productive?

Far from boosting efficiency in the workplace, Dr Ian Campbell, former chair of the National Obesity Forum, warns: “Because your body starts to go into starvation mode, conserving energy by slowing your metabolism, you feel sluggish. You’re less able to make decisions and more likely to make mistakes.”

The one thing I know both from personal experience, and from feedback from my clients, is that spending time on your health and real nutrition increases alertness and energy levels.

Which is more productive, working with low energy and concentration or being fully awake and alive?

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